Hotnhit Newsfeatures
ART 'N' CULTURE

HotnHit Newsfeatures

 

See latest Orissa News @

 

   

 

Are you worried for Marriage/ Child Birth/ Chronic Disease/ Legal Battle/ Business or Employment???

Could be A Star Impact!

For a detail analysis of your horoscope and suggestions for remedy,

Call

Bhubaneswar (Orissa) based Astrologer

Trinandan Mishra

at

09861121875

Volunteers!

Please visit the complete Volunteers' Forum Volunteers India Complete database for Volunteers

 

 

Abandoned Cannon Worhipped as God

"Amidst the sharp prickly thorns from the dangling branches of the overgrown shrubs and trees the names of which I don’t know, the not so beaten way up to the height where lay abandoned an antiquated, semi-rusted cannon of nineteenth century that is worshipped as a deity by the locals which include the tribals and general populace, was not very welcoming."

Gurbir Singh : May 25, 2009

The twenty kilometers car ride from Parlakhemundi to Narayanpur in Rayagada block of Gajapati district - a courtesy extended by a senior journalist was smooth, but the climb atop a very small hillock behind the local school called Nilamani High School was nevertheless very untidy and tiring. Amidst the sharp prickly thorns from the dangling branches of the overgrown shrubs and trees the names of which I don’t know, the not so beaten way up to the height where lay abandoned an antiquated, semi-rusted cannon of nineteenth century that is worshipped as a deity by the locals which include the tribals and general populace, was not very welcoming.

But sighting the round, rusted iron pipe of the cannon of the British Era that might have blown off many heads was an experience that inspired a little awe into our own excited heads. It lay there, with other major parts missing. Rusted, yet still very robust. The top of the buxom diameter at the rear end smeared with vermillion marks, had the naive, sacred company of many used earthen lighting pots, the left over parts of burnt incense sticks and their wrappers which had been used to worship it. The locals worship it on all the four Tuesdays of the Hindu month of Chaitra, equating it with goddess Manikeshwari, for fulfillment of wishes like grant of boon for birth of an offspring, for getting a job and maybe, also to get rid of some chronic disease.

Mangulu Mohanty, a local youth happens to be a journo, youth leader and politician told us the very many spiritual beliefs connected to the cannon. The legends are many, as they usually are associated with all other places of spiritual interest in our country or elsewhere, but I could hardly connect to that. He told a bit authoritatively how chickens were sacrificed for wish fulfillment at the altar of the dilapidated, forsaken cannon, almost carrying in his tone the genuineness of a gratified wish.

The two village elders named Sarat Chandra Majhi and L.P. Padhi, both retired teachers and now in their late seventies, stopped sort of vouchsafing for the authenticity in their nephew’s tone. They got reminiscent of their own parents and grandparents, remembering their own childhood days, when they followed them with this endowed spiritual initiation. The vital link was still missing- how it all got started. There is no written record.

N. Gantayata, a septuagenarian local journalist believed to be a knowledgeable man in the locality, said that the cannon had been used by the tribal rebels during unrest in a time that preceded even the first war of Indian Independence. There were two of such cannons, another one hardly four kilometers away in Lanjipadar - both worshipped as deities.  He repeated the local version of tradition, though with some elegance of intellectualism and unrecorded historic content.

Up there in a distance, stood a huge mountain with a single piece of very large boulder that bore an unmistakable and remarkable resemblance to an elephant head. Natural and uncarved, the stony contour of low neck and high forehead of the elephant shaped rock nearby is centre to many folktales and beliefs. They say people pour milk on it to welcome rain during drought. 

Down there on the nearby hillock, while the deity cannon awaits for the wish granting festive time, the neem tree under which it receives prayers, looks greener and healthier, thanks to the wood choppers who spared it for the reasons best known to them.

Author is the District Information and Public Relation Officer, Gajapati, Orissa

 

>>> ART/CULTURE >>> HOME

 
Copy rights reserved with HOTnHIT Newsfeatures, Bhubaneswar, Orissa, INDIA