HotnHit Newsfeatures

 VOICE OF PEOPLE, VOICE OF NATION

EDITORIAL / DEVELOPMENT / ISSUE

 

Home I Editorial I Views I Issues I Politics I Economy I Agriculture I Society I Culture I History I Development I Entertainment I Environment I Science I Sports I Wildlife

 
   

Australian coal mine deal of Adani faces strong criticism

 

Robyn Lawley opposes coal mining by Adani

Posted on 31 Jul 2014

Last updated 06 Jul 2016

  Adani, Galilee Basin Coal Mine, Australia
While the India based Adani Mining's the new mine in Queensland’s Galilee Basin would take 297 billion litres of water from underground aquifers and cause a drop in water table levels on which local farmers rely, it would also destroy a significant proportion of the remaining habitat of the endangered black-throated finch.
Basudev Mahapatra
 

The Carmichael coal mine deal between India based Adani mining and Australian government is termed as a bad news for water resources, wildlife and the global effort to tackle climate change, said the Australian Conservation Foundation (ACF).

The Queensland and Australian governments have approved the new mine despite concerns about potential effects on endangered springs and the Great Artesian Basin, which were raised by the government-appointed Independent Expert Scientific Committee, said the News.

Condemning the decision of the Australian government, Model Robyn Lawley posted a naked selfie with the words “stop coal mining” painted on her stomach.

“I’m shocked and feel powerless so I decided to get people to read this one way or another, we have to stop them ... before it’s too late,” said Robyn as quoted by the News.

Federal environment minister Greg Hunt approved the deal, on July 28, for mining coal from a huge new coal mine in Queensland’s Galilee Basin which, on reaching peak production, is expected to export 60 million tonnes of thermal coal per year to India, via the port at Abbot Point on the Great Barrier Reef coast.

Coal from the Carmichael mine will be shipped through the Great Barrier Reef, where dredging for a new coal export terminal will damage coral and harm marine life, said a release issued by ACF.

 

Mentioning that Adani – a company with a history of environmental breaches – faces multi-million dollar fines in India for violation of environmental clearances and bypassing approval procedures, the ACF release assessed that coal from the Carmichael mine, when burnt, would produce 128.4 million tonnes of CO2 per year, at peak production, or four times the total carbon emissions of New Zealand.

As per reports, the mega mine will cover 200 square kilometres and will include six open cut pits and five underground mines. It is forecast to produce 60 million tonnes of thermal coal a year for export.

Greenpeace, the environmental issue advocacy organisation, has already warned about the possible damages to be caused by the project saying, “The mine would be linked to the coast by a new railway line, crossing farmland and floodplains, and spreading toxic coal dust. The coal will be loaded into ships at the new Terminal Zero jetty at Abbot Point, with huge coal stockpiles and machinery wedged between the delicate Caley Valley wetlands and a turtle-nesting beach, less than 100m away.”

The website of Adani mining however says that “Carmichael Coal Mine and Rail Project will deliver many benefits to the local, state and national economies.”

Mentioning that the proponent of the Carmichael mine, Adani – a company with a history of environmental breaches – faces multi-million dollar fines in India for violation of environmental clearances and bypassing approval procedures, the ACF release assessed that coal from the Carmichael mine, when burnt, would produce 128.4 million tonnes of CO2 per year, at peak production, or four times the total carbon emissions of New Zealand.

“Mining uses huge quantities of water and this mine will be a massive drain on Queensland’s precious groundwater resources,” said the Australian Conservation Foundation’s healthy ecosystems campaigner Ruchira Talukdar.

While the mine would take 297 billion litres of water from underground aquifers and cause a drop in water table levels on which local farmers rely, it would also destroy a significant proportion of the remaining habitat of the endangered black-throated finch, said ACF.

The Australian Environment Minister Greg Hunt said to a part of media that Adani would return a minimum of 730 megalitres of water to the Basin every year for five years.

“According to the federal environmental laws, we have still put 36 of the strictest, toughest conditions that have ever been imposed,” Hunt said.

Apprehending that the strictures would become insufficient to protect the environment, Talukdar said, “While some of the conditions imposed by the Environment Minister are welcome, they cannot stop this mine from being an environmental disaster.”

“If the federal government’s proposed handover of environmental approval powers to states goes ahead, there will effectively be nobody to monitor or enforce compliance with these conditions, as the Queensland department is under-resourced and incapable of adequately monitoring compliance,” she said.

Visit us on Google+

Post a comment

If you look at issues from the

perspective of common man

and

want to share your ideas with our readers across the globe

submit your article

(at least 800 words)

at

hotnhitnews@yahoo.com

blog comments powered by Disqus
IN THE ARCHIVE
 
About Us I Contact Us I Get Our Guideline
Copy Right 2004 @ HOTnHIT Newsfeatures, Bhubaneswar, INDIA