HotnHit Newsfeatures

 VOICE OF PEOPLE, VOICE OF NATION

ISSUE
 

Home I Editorial I Views I Issues I Politics I Economy I Agriculture I Society I Culture I History I Development I Entertainment I Environment I Science I Sports I Wildlife

 
   

Bay of Bengal deadlier than Mediterranean for migrants and refugees

 

Photo by: Tarsh and Tariq Thekaekara
Photo by: Tarsh and Tariq Thekaekara
Photo by: Tarsh and Tariq Thekaekara
Photo by: Tarsh and Tariq Thekaekara

Photo credit: UNHCR/ S. H. Omi

Bhubaneswar |

Last updated 25 Feb 2016 01:06 +0530

  Bay of Bengal, UNHCR, Migrant, Mediterranean Sea
Refugees and migrants crossing the seas of Southeast Asia died at a rate three times higher than those in the Mediterranean last year, a new United Nations report has found, highlighting the urgency of greater life-saving cooperation among the affected States.
 

As migrant movements in the Bay of Bengal are in the rise because of many reasons, including political conflict and sluggish economic development in several countries, those movements had been “three times more deadly” than in the Mediterranean last year, due largely to mistreatment by smugglers and disease on the boats, states the report, Mixed Maritime Movements in South-East Asia, from the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR).

Refugees and migrants often employ the same routes, modes of transport, and networks, and their movements are commonly referred to as “mixed movements.”

Across the region, an estimated 33,600 refugees and migrants of various nationalities had taken to smugglers' boats, including 32,600 in the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea, where the bulk of the passengers had been Rohingya and Bangladeshi, according to the report, which was summarized for the press by UNHCR spokesperson Andreas Needham and the regular bi-weekly briefing in Geneva on February 23, 2016.

The first half of 2015 had seen the highest-ever estimated departures – 31,000 – while the number was 1,600 in the second half. The full-year departures were just over half of the record-setting previous year. This decrease can be attributed to a number of factors, including the discovery of mass graves along the Thailand-Malaysia land border with the remains of over 200 presumed earlier arrivals, government crackdowns on smuggling networks and scrutiny of traditional departure and arrival points.

But the 2015 fatality rate had still been three times higher in those waters than in the Mediterranean Sea, the report highlights. Some of the tales recorded in the report described harrowing experiences: death by starvation, people thrown overboard alive, and suffering from various debilitating diseases.

Some 370 people are believed to have died in the Bay of Bengal and the Andaman Sea during the year, the report says; not from drowning but from mistreatment and disease brought about by smugglers who abused and in many cases killed passengers with impunity. The toll also includes those killed in a fight over diminishing supplies on a boat that had been prevented from landing on two occasions. Some of these deaths could have been prevented with prompt disembarkation.

Quotation starts

Nearly 170,000 Rohingya and Bangladeshis are estimated to have made the dangerous journey from the Bay of Bengal since 2012

Quotation ends

Root Causes Must Be Addressed

UNHCR believes that unless the root causes of displacement are addressed, people will continue risking their lives on smugglers' boats to seek safety and stability elsewhere.

Mr. Needham said that there are a number of processes in motion to address this issue.

There remains an urgent need for affected States to take concrete action to coordinate procedures for rescue at sea, predictable places to disembark passengers safely, as well as adequate reception and screening systems on arrival. People who fled their homes and cannot return due to an absence of protection should be granted temporary refuge and have access to basic rights and services while longer-term solutions are sought.

To minimize deaths at sea, safe and legal channels including labour migration and family reunification programs must be opened up for people leaving difficult conditions at home.

UNHCR hopes that labour migration arrangements could also be put in place for the Rohingya already in labour-importing countries, enabling them to contribute to the economies of their host and home countries.

Next month's Bali Process Ministerial Meeting will be a timely opportunity to make progress on these issues, Mr. Needham said. A lifting of existing restrictions on freedom of movement and access to services throughout Rakhine state in Myanmar would allow thousands of people to live more normal lives and be less likely to risk dangerous sea journeys, he said.

UNHCR is also watching with interest the Bangladesh Government's plans to list hundreds of thousands of undocumented Rohingya in south-eastern Bangladesh, and the agency hopes that the exercise will result in improved documentation and access to services.

Nearly 170,000 Rohingya and Bangladeshis are estimated to have made the dangerous journey from the Bay of Bengal since 2012, as per the report.

 

Follow HotnHitNews at Google+

 

 

Post a comment

If you look at issues from the

perspective of common man

and

want to share your ideas with our readers across the globe

submit your article

(at least 800 words)

at

hotnhitnews@yahoo.com

IN THE ARCHIVE

Should India allow Metahistory in school curricula?

Odisha should adopt Gram Sabha system to ensure democracy in villages

Posco India: Khandadhar may take Odisha's War for Steel to next stage

CBI to investigate chit fund scam: Will it offer Navin a bitter fourth term?

Posco: more troubles in the offing

Posco India: Diplomatic Pressure felt in Odisha!

Rape, Violence and Movies: India needs more responsible cinema

Poverty and surplus fund situation go hand-in-hand in Odisha

Orissa experiences the wrath of Climate Change in India

Mahatma Gandhi wanted an end to untouchability only, but not to caste system - John Dayal

Victim of Mining - Sukinda fast converts into a death trap

Sea level rise and inundation of Coastal India

The communal face of Indian Maoists

Violence in Orissa's Kandhamal - Social conflict and Economic gap led to Communal hatred

Orissa's Lake Chilka faces danger of submergence

Dolphins whistle loud in Orissa when roaring tigers do vanish

River Ganges faces the wrath of Global Warming

Orissa in a globalised economy - Challenges ahead

Crime Reporting in India - Publicising criminals than condemning Crimes

Hirakud Dam needs a proper management system to realise its objectives

Kalahandi - Cursed with Industries

 

Vanniyar-Dalit conflict of Dharmapuri: Fallout of caste-based politics in Tamil Nadu

COP 18: Doha Climate Summit brings no solution to Climate Change

India needs to promote responsible use of social media

Odisha: Transparency in Bureaucracy holds key to make Decentralised Planning a reality

Sandy made Climate Change a political issue in the US

Odisha: Illegal Mining Issue fuels Power War

Odisha: Rio Tinto builds diplomatic pressure for revival of its mining operations

Man Elephant Conflict: Study emphasises upon elephant individuality to prevent conflict with human

Vedanta University project - A Real Estate Deal in disguise

Development Goals (MDGs) and the NGO movement in India

Agriculture Vs Industrialisation: Indian Economy pushed to a jump-shift

Politics of Regional Nationality

Coal Bed Methane (CBM) - A natural resource base Orissa should Explore

Onion Farming can stop labour migration in most part of Orissa

Sun Temple of Konark - Heritage in freezes

Female Foeticide in India - Medieval mindset rules over Indian society

Television Journalism in India - Money and Sensationalism overpower ethics and principles

A Teacher not allowed into the School - Another sign of caste discrimination in Orissa

Turtle Cry - Less safety for Turtles, more troubles for Fishing Communities

About Us I Contact Us I Get Our Guideline
Copy Right 2004 @ , Bhubaneswar, INDIA