HotnHit Newsfeatures

 VOICE OF PEOPLE, VOICE OF NATION

ISSUE/ DEVELOPMENT
 

Home I Editorial I Views I Issues I Politics I Economy I Agriculture I Society I Culture I History I Development I Entertainment I Environment I Science I Sports I Wildlife

 
   

Food wastage still an issue though India ranks better in GHI

 

Source: IFPRI

Bhubaneswar,

Last updated 06 Jul 2016 01:02 IST

  India, Global Hunger Index, IFPRI, Food
The recently released World Hunger Report has come with a reason of relief for the government of India because, as per the report, the number of hungry people in the country has declined and the its score on the Global Hunger Index (GHI) improving to 55th position in 2014 from 63rd last year.
 

In India, where millions of people in a country of 1.2 billion go without food every day, the question of hunger is less about insufficient food production but of excessive food wastage, reports suggest.

“Such massive wastage in wholesale markets across the country is threatening India's food security,” said a Channel News Asia report quoting experts.

Take clues from statistical data, the report suggested that food spoilage, and not production, is the issue. “India produced an estimated 263 million tonnes of food last year, of which 33 million tonnes was excess output,” the report said.

Even today, more than 190 million people continue to starve in the country although, as per Global Hunger Index 2014, the hunger status in India has improved significantly.

The recently released World Hunger Report has come with a reason of relief for the government of India because, as per the report, the number of hungry people in the country has declined and the its score on the Global Hunger Index (GHI) improving to 55th position in 2014 from 63rd last year.

India’s position in the index is up Pakistan (rank 57) and Bangladesh (57) but it still trails behind Nepal (44) and Sri Lanka (39) in the subcontinent.

"Progress in dealing with underweight helped India's 2014 GHI score fall to 17.8 points and rank 55 out of 76 countries," said the report adding that no longer in the "alarming" category, India's hunger status still remains "serious.”

 

Quotation starts

India still has the highest number of underweight children under five in the world and 70% of children are anaemic though the proportion of undernourished people in the overall population has fallen from 21.5 per cent in 2004-06 to 17 per cent in 2011-13.

Quotation ends

 

In its provisional national child underweight estimate determined after in 8 years, India has made significant improvement over the last estimate of 43.5 percent underweight in 2005-2006 which has now come down to 30.7 percent in 2013-2014, almost 13% decline in prevalence of underweight in case of children under five, the report says on basis of data provided by the India’s Ministry of Women and Child Development and UNICEF.

As per the report, India no longer ranks second-to-last in the world on underweight in children. Instead, it has moved into the 120th spot among 128 countries. Progress on child underweight helped India’s 2014 GHI score fall to 17.8, a decline of 26 percent, or 6.4 points, between the 2005 GHI and the 2014 GHI. This outpaces the drop seen in other South Asian countries during this period.

Giving credit of the success in reducing hunger to several government programmes programs that targeted causes of undernutrition, including the Integrated Child Development Services program and the National Rural Health Mission, and the Supreme Court appointed a commission to monitor the delivery of food-based programs, the report said, “Indirect factors that contributed to less hunger in India may have included the National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme—a rural jobs program—and reforms to the Public Distribution System that distributes food to the poor.”

However, as per IFPRI estimates, India still has the highest number of underweight children under five in the world and 70% of children are anaemic though the proportion of undernourished people in the overall population has fallen from 21.5 per cent in 2004-06 to 17 per cent in 2011-13.

While the country has made significant progress in reducing underweight among children under five in the past few years, "much work still needs to be done" at the national and state levels so that a greater share of the population will enjoy nutrition security, the report suggested.

As per the report, the overall score for Asia in the 2014 GHI scores remained better than the 1990 GHI scores, which fell by 54 percent in East and Southeast Asia, and by 41 percent in South Asia. South Asia saw the steepest absolute decline in its score, amounting to more than 12 points.

“Several Southeast Asian and South Asian countries showed dramatically improved scores since 1990, including Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand, and Bangladesh,” the report said observing that “The state of hunger in developing countries as a group has improved since 1990, falling by 39 percent.”

Despite progress made, the level of hunger in the world is still “serious,” with 805 million people continuing to go hungry, according to estimates by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

Regionally, the highest GHI scores—and therefore the highest hunger levels—are in Africa south of the Sahara and South Asia, which have also experienced the greatest absolute improvements since 2005.

“In terms of absolute progress, comparing the 1990 GHI and the 2014 GHI, Angola, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Chad, Ghana, Malawi, Niger, Rwanda, Thailand, and Vietnam saw the biggest improvements in scores,” said the report adding, “From the 1990 GHI to the 2014 GHI, 26 countries reduced their scores by 50 percent or more.”

Levels of hunger are “extremely alarming” or “alarming” in 16 countries, with Burundi and Eritrea both classified as “extremely alarming,” according to the report that also pointed that most of the countries with “alarming” GHI scores are in Africa south of the Sahara.

However, the report expressed its concern over hidden hunger or micronutrient deficiency which affects some 2 billion people around the world.

Caused due to shortage in essential vitamins and minerals, this can have long-term, irreversible health effects as well as socioeconomic consequences that can erode a person’s well-being and development, the report said cautioning that “By affecting people’s productivity, it can also take a toll on countries’ economies.”

Citing that “Poor diet, disease, impaired absorption, and increased micronutrient needs during certain life stages, such as pregnancy, lactation, and infancy, are among the causes of hidden hunger, which may “invisibly” affect the health and development of a population,” the report suggested, “Possible solutions to hidden hunger include food-based approaches: dietary diversification, which might involve growing more diverse crops in a home garden; fortification of commercial foods; and biofortification, in which food crops are bred with increased micronutrient content.”

With one more year before the 2015 deadline for achieving the Millennium Development Goals, the 2014 Global Hunger Index report offers a multifaceted overview of global hunger that brings new insights to the global debate on where to focus efforts in the fight against hunger and malnutrition, said the report giving a call to the world for serious action.

Visit us on Google+

Post a comment

If you look at issues from the

perspective of common man

and

want to share your ideas with our readers across the globe

submit your article

(at least 800 words)

at

hotnhitnews@yahoo.com

IN THE ARCHIVE
 
About Us I Contact Us I Get Our Guideline
Copy Right 2004 @ , Bhubaneswar, INDIA